Knights’ Lecture Series Combat Anti-Catholic Hostility

1912 Christopher Columbus Memorial Dedication, Washington, D.C.
1912 Christopher Columbus Memorial Dedication, Washington, D.C.

As membership in the Knights of Columbus grew, the Order became increasingly known as a force for public good. Following the dedication ceremony for the Christopher Columbus Memorial Fountain in Washington, D.C., in 1912, a reporter for The Washington Star noted that the large number of Knights in attendance “marked anew the important position of the Knights of Columbus as an order in the social fabric of the United States.”

In response to growing anti-Catholic hostility and the rise of socialism, two Knights, David Goldstein and Peter W. Collins, embarked on an extensive, 27,000-mile lecture tour throughout North America in 1914.

Tens of thousands of copies of a “bogus oath” are circulated to defame the Knights of Columbus. The Knights, in turn, lay the groundwork for a lecture series and educational programs to combat anti-Catholic hostility. Between 1914 and 1917, the number of anti-Catholic publications drops from 60 to fewer than five.

Knights’ Long History of Support for the Catholic University of America

Charter Ceremony for Notre Dame Council #1477 in 1910
Charter Ceremony for Notre Dame Council #1477 in 1910

The Knights expanded to college campuses in the early-20th century. In 1904, more than 10,000 Knights and their families attended ceremonies at The Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C., in which the Order presented the school with a grant for more than $55,000. The funds, used to establish a K of C chair of American history, began a long history of support for CUA.  From 1909 to 1913, Knights raise $500,000 to establish a permanent endowment for CUA.

In addition, students at the University of Notre Dame in Indiana soon organized their own K of C council.  Chartered in 1910, Notre Dame Council 1477 was the Order’s first college council, launching a subset of the Knights that today includes councils at 244 schools worldwide.

Knights of Columbus Logo
Knights of Columbus Logo

Knights Acknowledged by Vatican in 1895

In 1895, the Vatican’s first acknowledgment of the Knights comes when Archbishop Francesco Satolli, apostolic delegate to the United States, writes a letter extolling the “merits of this splendid Catholic organization” and giving the Order his apostolic blessing.

Archbishop Francesco Satolli
Archbishop Francesco Satolli

By the beginning of the 20th century, the fledgling Order was growing dramatically. Councils had been chartered throughout the United States and Canada, and international expansion continued to Mexico and the Philippines in 1905, along with Cuba and Panama in 1909.

Knights of Columbus Council #1000 marks the international expansion into the Philippines in 1905.

Knights of Columbus Charter for the 1st Council in the Philippines
Knights of Columbus Charter for the 1st Council in the Philippines

Why Columbus?

Why Columbus?

Portrait of Christopher Columbus
Portrait of Christopher Columbus

As a symbol that allegiance to their country did not conflict with allegiance to their faith, the organization’s members took as their patron Christopher Columbus — recognized as a Catholic and celebrated as the discoverer of America. Thanks to Father McGivney’s persistence, the Knights of Columbus elected officers in February 1882 and officially assumed corporate status on March 29.

Founding Place of the Knights

St. Mary’s Church in New Haven, CT.  This was the place where the Knights of Columbus was founded.  Late-19th century Connecticut was marked by the growing prevalence of fraternal benefit societies, hostility toward Catholic immigrants and dangerous working conditions in factories that left many families fatherless.

Picture of St. Mary's Church in New Haven, CT
Founding place of the Knights of Columbus

Recognizing a vital, practical need in his community, Father Michael J. McGivney, the 29-year-old assistant pastor of St. Mary’s Church in New Haven, Connecticut, gathered a group of men at his parish on Oct. 2, 1881. He proposed establishing a lay organization, the goal of which would be to prevent Catholic men from entering secret societies whose membership was antithetical to Church teaching, to unite men of Catholic faith and to provide for the families of deceased members.

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